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Eagle Syndrome - Online Support Group

Scars, Surgery Recovery, CT Scans — PICS 📷

So pleased that you’re seeing ES symptoms improve! It is still early days yet, & while there’s still some swelling things are still healing, so I wouldn’t worry about things at the moment, easier said than done. Everything’s way better than at this stage after your last surgery isn’t it?
And thank you for your input in the site- it’s great when members like you who are in the middle of your own journey with your own worries take the time to encourage others & give them support- it’s what makes the Bens Friends sites so amazing & helpful! :+1::heartbeat:
You’re in my prayers, gentle hugs for you!

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Surgery Recovery tip for swelling : lymphatic drainage massage. Talk to your doctor about it.
Here’s a helpful link with instructions to massage your neck yourself :slight_smile:

Neck massage

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Well, after 2 1/2 years of feeling like something was stuck in my throat, and a week now of dull pain, I went ahead and turned my CT images into a 3D model. I can’t think of a better title for it than “well there’s your problem”:

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Indeed! You can’t tell exactly from that angle, but it looks like there could well be a very narrow gap between the SP, on the left pic side especially, & the cervical vertebrae process. That can obvs cause symptoms!

Indeed, ouch!

Here is my surgery scar for the right side - AND FINAL surgery. I am 8 days post op and just had the stitch removed. I say “stitch” because the surgeon showed me the one long thread he pulled out. The left line in the photo is glue from the bandage.

I asked if he had taken a picture of the bone and he then showed me a pic on his cell phone. I expected to see the usual bone next to a ruler but it was a picture of the actual surgery!! In the photo was the bone exposed in the tissue of my neck. It was stomach churning at first but on the way home my mind kept going back to the image. Having seen this it 100% reaffirmed that it needed to go. It was thick and long and buried deep in the tissue and I am so glad that its outta there.

After the first surgery my jawline and neck above the incision was completely numb for quite awhile. This time around I am already getting tingling feeling on the skin and shooting pains in my jawline to my chin. Good, but also the pain level is much higher this time around. Maybe that will mean my recovery will be shorter. :pray: My lip isnt numb but has temp paralysis. Having had this experience the first time around so I know this will pass. I am not sure if I have FBS yet or if its pain from the surgery.

Dr. Delacure of NYU Langone performed the surgery. Everything about the surgery, from the surgeon and staff to the facilities could not have been better. (OK, maybe not perfect as the scheduling department ping-ponged me back and forth between two different days until I said that’s enough. For clarification, Dr. D’s office did everything they could to make it work. It was the surgical suite’s scheduling department that kept making changes: Monday morning, then Tuesday morning, then back to Monday morning, then Tuesday afternoon at 4pm, then tuesday at 11 am) Though I had post op pain and nausea, the post op unit nurses were compassionate and were there throughout to help with the pain management. I had called a few days after my operation with some concerns and my call was returned within a few hours by Dr. Delacure’s PA and right hand man, Justine. He was reassuring, knowledgeable and caring - together they make a great team. I had to travel for the first surgery but I would recommend Dr. D. to anyone needing this surgery. For NYer’s and environs, there is no longer the need to travel to have this done. BONUS: Dr. Delacure is also a plastic surgeon so my incision is clean and should be barely noticeably before long.

Peace to all.
BG

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Interesting! The left side (actually my right, this is an anterior view) is angled forward quite a bit as well. I do wish I could see the blood vessels as well to see if there is any interaction that could cause neurological symptoms as well. I’ve always assumed my fatigue and difficulty with motivation have been related to clinical anxiety and depression. Wouldn’t it be interesting if it was compounded by an anatomic component as well? Either way, I think “elongated” is pretty clear here!

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So glad for you that it’s over, even if you had to see it! Hope the pain etc settles soon; interesting how different the surgeries can be, although I know you had different surgeons… :hugs: :bouquet: :pray:

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Yes different surgeons, but different issues and outcomes because of how the styloid grows - whether straight, curved, pointy, thickness, etc.

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@BrooklynGirl Thank you for sharing ! Your scar looks amazing.

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WOWEE!, DocHoliday! You’ve got one really long styloid & one that is funkily curved & very pointy looking. I agree w/ your assessment than “well, there’s your problem!!” Now off you scoot to find a doctor to get those nasty things out of your neck. Sounds like Dr. Delacure who just did BrooklynGirl’s surgery might be a good choice for you.

Regarding your comment about anxiety, fatigue & motivation, those can be affected by an irritated vagus nerve. Since the vagus nerve is so comprehensive in our bodies, it is almost always affected by ES. Those symptoms usually subside or become significantly less once the styloids are removed. You are also correct in thinking vascular compression could be playing a role though more often, it causes dizziness, headaches, intracranial hypertension, fainting spells, hearing the heartbeat in the ear, etc.

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BrooklynGirl,

I’m so glad to read this follow-up post & see how well your incision is healing. That is one nice, clean incision, & I’m sure will become invisible as time passes. I’m glad you’re so happy with both the surgeon & his office & that you asserted yourself w/ the hospital’s surgical dept. Way to go!! It’s also fantastic news that our ES members in the east now have another doctor to whom they can refer for support & surgery. The more we get the better!

I hope you have enough energy & are feeling well enough to enjoy Christmas & the surrounding holidays. Again, I’m so thankful for your good report. I will be praying that your pains continue to resolve & recovery is much quicker than last time.

:gift_heart:

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This necklace made me kind of laugh. If you ever wanted an ironic necklace to showcase what your Styloids might look like in silver, well, here ya go… even has diamonds! Would you wear it around your neck?? :face_with_monocle:


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Ha!!! That thing in the middle is totally the hyoid.

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premedmom & SewMomma -

You both make me laugh! :rofl: :rofl:

That necklace is too funny!! Only we Eagle folks would understand the humor in it!

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:joy::joy::joy::joy: noooo I wouldn’t wear it, it would make my neck hurt in sympathy!

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How’s everyone doing that’s recovering from a recent surgery? Feeling good about it ? Feeling well?

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Hi Premedmom,
How are you? Thanks for asking.

Before the second surgery on the right I was having referred pain on the left. Immediately after the second surgery I noticed the referred pain was gone. The referred pain comes and goes but I am confident when more healing time has passed, this too will pass. Overall I feel the surgeries were the right thing to do but more time is needed to see how much relief I get. I had vascular issues that were relieved after the first surgery. I also had very aggravated vagus nerves after the first surgery that affected my breathing, heart rate and stomach, but thankfully after two months it was mostly gone. No vagus nerve issues after the second surgery :pray:but is more painful and my skin on my jawline is very, VERY sensitive which is very painful - I cannot let anything touch the area but lidocaine helps! I did not have this the first time because I was very numb.

All the best.
BG

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Hi @BrooklynGirl It’s so nice to hear your positive thoughts and insight. I am glad to hear you are not having vagus issues again.

I too feel surgery was the right thing. Unfortunately I am still having some issues in my throat. I don’t know what the heck it is. I do not even know how to describe it necessarily, which makes me lose hope it’ll ever go away if I can’t explain it to my doctor.

Best effort to explain…maybe y’all can help me make it sound legit so I can relay it to my ent. :tired_face:Basically, I still feel a “stick” like pain in an area behind my tongue but lower on the left side. Except after the 2nd surgery (on same side) this time it feels almost “flappy”? Rice and small particles almost seem to get stuck there. It’s hard at times to swallow liquids, solids is easier. That led me to believe my epiglottis is swollen. But I also get hoarse and strain to talk often. Swallowing is still weird. I read about paralysis of different folds and vocal chords and wouldn’t be surprised if that’s what’s going on. I’m still pretty swollen, sensitive like you said, and healing so I will try to be patient. Maybe it’s just scar tissue I have to live with from either the oral or neck surgery. It’s just stinky to feel like I have a tough piece of lettuce stuck in the back of my throat at all times. I am way too ocd for that.

Tomorrow is our 18th wedding anniversary so just lookin forward to that and all God has for us in 2020.

Happy New Year!

Very glad that you’ve seen improvements this time & not the vagus nerve issues…hope that the painful area settles soon.

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